Community Health and Environmental Justice

Fruit outside of Jalisco Produce Market

Where We Want to Be

In the future

  • A high quality of life for residents of all ages, income levels, and abilities that increases life expectancy and reduces the disparity between racial groups.

  • All residents have access to timely and high quality preventive and health services, and the differences between areas with the highest and lowest access is reduced.

  • All residents breathe clean air, are not exposed to hazardous materials, and the disparities between areas with the highest and lowest pollution exposure is reduced.

  • All residents have convenient and safe access to opportunities in their neighborhoods to be physically active, and the disparities between areas with the highest and lowest access is reduced.

  • All residents have access to fresh, affordable, and culturally relevant produce, and the disparities between areas with the highest and lowest access is reduced.

  • All residents live in safe and sanitary housing without risk of displacement.

Performance

Metrics

01Performance Metric:

Low-income food insecurity

Target:

Decrease the percentage of adults who are low-income food insecure

Data:

2018 data: 4.2% of the city's adult population

02Performance Metric:

Healthy weight

Target:

Decrease the proportion of children and adults who are obese

Data:

03Performance Metric:

Severe housing cost-burden

Target:

Decrease the percentage of low-income households who contribute more than 50% of their gross income on housing

Data:

04Performance Metric:

Asthma

Target:

Decrease the percentage of children and adults who have been diagnosed with asthma

Data:

How Our Plan

Gets Us There

Person holding their community vision for the South San Francisco at a Shape SSF visioning workshop in Spanish

Place, race, income, and environmental conditions are all significant contributing factors to the health of South San Francisco. The city’s physical, social, and economic environments combine to make specific individuals and communities face a disproportionate burden of environmental pollution yet also have access to fewer of the city's existing health-promoting assets that make it a great place to live, work, and play. Therefore, the Community Health and Environmental Justice Element includes goals and policies that address existing community health concerns as well as approaches to managing new development to prevent future health and environmental justice issues. The topics covered include timely preventive healthcare, healthy food, pollution exposure, physical activity, safe housing, and anti-displacement.

Key Issues and Opportunities

Health Status
and Life Expectancy
Health Status and Life Expectancy

Life expectancy varies based on race and ethnicity, gender identity, place of residence, and many other factors. On average, life expectancy in South San Francisco is 82.2 years, which is nearly 3 years less than the overall life expectancy for San Mateo County (85.0 years). Across the county, Black and African American residents (79.0 years) live 6 years less than the countywide average. Although there is no single cause for this disparity, it suggests that African Americans in San Mateo County are experiencing hardships through physical, social, and economic conditions that negatively impact their health status and life expectancy.

People waiting for running race to start
Pollution Burden and Disadvantaged Communities
Access
to Amenities
Affordable Housing and Protecting Current Residents
Townhomes along a street

It is the overall goal of this Community Health and Environmental Justice Element to ensure that goals, policies, and actions address the needs of all South San Francisco residents. Priority, however, should be given to those projects and programs that would fulfill the needs of residents living in disadvantaged communities.

policy

framework

Goal CHEJ-1

Goal CHEJ-1:

South San Francisco is a leader in promoting healthy communities through collaboration, prevention, and education.

Intent:

To promote more collaboration across County agencies, City departments, community-based and service organizations, and the private sector in order to improve the health status, including physical and mental health, of South San Francisco residents.

Policy CHEJ-1.1: Increase access to healthcare.

Increase access to healthcare for low-income South San Francisco residents through the City’s Promotores and city navigators in partnership with the County, service providers, and non-profits.

  • Action CHEJ-1.1.1: Assist in navigation of health and social services.

    Recruit and hire promotores and city navigators who can provide culturally and linguistically responsive navigation to help low-income residents and residents of color learn about, connect to, and navigate healthcare and social services.

  • Action CHEJ-1.1.2: County health partnerships.

    Continue to work with San Mateo County and healthcare service providers to educate residents about existing services throughout the city and encourage them to provide culturally and linguistically competent services. Work with San Mateo County to explore opportunities to improve access to mental health services, especially for youth and young adults.

  • Action CHEJ-1.1.3: Offer health literacy programs.

    Continue to offer programs, collections and outreach initiatives in the libraries, recreation centers, senior centers, and in public schools as educational support for community members seeking information on health and medical needs; partner with the South San Francisco Unified School District, County, and local non-profits in providing these resources.

  • Action CHEJ-1.1.4: Partner with South San Francisco Unified School District to provide school-based health centers.

    Continue to partner with the South San Francisco Unified School District to promote the flexible use of community spaces (e.g., community centers, libraries, schools) to provide preventive health services for children, youth, and families. Explore opportunities to expand services in neighborhoods with the greatest deficiencies.

  • Action CHEJ-1.1.5: Explore healthcare public private partnerships.

    Explore innovative private and public partnerships to provide pharmacies and medical, dental, and mental health services in underserved areas like Downtown and in new residential areas of Lindenville and East of 101.

  • Action CHEJ-1.1.6: Provide nonprofit and community health centers.

    Partner with nonprofit and community health centers to provide free or low-cost health care to low-income households.

  • Action CHEJ-1.1.7: Establish community paramedicine program.

    Explore the establishment of a community paramedic program to help identify residents who suffer from chronic illness and educate and connect them with appropriate healthcare services.

  • Action CHEJ-1.1.8: Reduce documentation for healthcare access.

    Work with San Mateo County and other agencies to minimize the documentation required to access healthcare services in order to reduce barriers to seeking and utilizing services, including eliminating requirements whenever possible.

Policy CHEJ-1.2. Improve crisis response.

Improve crisis response through the use of trained community wellness and crisis response teams.

  • Action CHEJ-1.2.1: Establish mental health crisis response pilot.

    Establish a community wellness and crisis response team pilot program to respond to emergency calls related to mental health, substance use, homelessness, and domestic violence. This response team will be focused on conflict management, de-escalation, and linking residents to supportive services.

  • Action CHEJ-1.2.2: Connect health and homeless services.

    Work with homeless service providers to conduct outreach and connect unhoused individuals to health care, housing and shelter, and other services.

  • Action CHEJ-1.2.3: Develop pandemic preparedness plan.

    Work with San Mateo County Health and local jurisdictions to develop a local pandemic preparedness plan in case of future pandemics.

Policy CHEJ-1.3: Collaborate with San Mateo County Health to share health-related data.

Improve crisis response through the use of trained community wellness and crisis response teams.

  • Action CHEJ-1.3.1: Maintain and report health data.

    Continue to maintain and report out indicators and metrics about the health status of residents over time by race/ethnicity. Work with the City’s Equity and Inclusion Officer to develop a standardized approach to tracking health data to address racial and social inequities in health outcomes.

Policy CHEJ-1.4: Integrate Health in All Policies approach.

Integrate a Health in All Policies approach across City departments to improve health and advance environmental justice, including close collaboration with San Mateo County agencies.

  • Action CHEJ-1.4.1: Require health impact assessment.

    Require health impact assessments for all specific, neighborhood, and master plans and major transportation investments to examine the health and equity implications of policy decisions.

  • Action CHEJ-1.4.2: Develop healthy development guidelines.

    Conduct a review of existing development guidelines to promote healthy living and working environments.

Policy: CHEJ-1.5: Facilitate community input on health-focused programs and priorities.

Facilitate community input on health-focused programs and priorities.

Goal CHEJ-2
Goal CHEJ-3
Goal CHEJ-4
Goal CHEJ-5
Goal CHEJ-6
Goal CHEJ-7